Intro to frozen desserts

Question. What is ice cream?
Answer. Ice cream is a relatively soft frozen dessert made with dairy products (milk, cream or yogurt), and/or fruits and flavorings. Examples of other names for ice cream are gelato, sorbet, frozen custard, etc. Ice cream may be served with other desserts, such as apple pie.


vanilla ice cream with sugar cone

What you need to know before making ice cream

Bacteria flourishes in protein-rich foods such as ice cream; protein in the egg yolks, milk, and cream.  Food poisoning is the primary danger of eating ‘old’ ice cream. Practicing proper hygiene techniques will help prevent foodborne illness. It’s important to understand that an ice cream that smells and tastes just fine doesn’t mean the ice cream is good.

A big misconception is that bacteria gets eliminated in the freezer. Freezer temperature simply slows the growth of bacteria that is already there. If you haven’t followed strict food safety techniques in washing, rinsing, and sanitizing the equipment that you used to make ice cream, chances are that there are bacteria in the ice cream mixture even before churning. Personal hygiene is also very important.

The shelf life of ice cream partly depends on the technique used to make the ice cream.
For your own safety, and the safety of your loved ones, make sure that the ice cream is frozen solid in the freezer, and discard any ice cream that has thawed completely. To store ice cream for longer than a month you can place plastic wrap right on top of the surface of the ice cream and then place the lid on top. Also, wrap the whole ice cream container with plastic wrap.

If you made ice cream at home, if properly wrapped (as mentioned above), you can safely store the ice cream in the freezer for a couple of weeks, maximum. Although it might be ok after 3 weeks, is it worth it to take a chance? Absolutely not. Don’t forget making ice cream at home, you don’t use any preservatives, which is why you make ice cream at home in the first place; to forgo the preservatives that ice cream manufacturers use.

For more info on proper hygiene techniques to follow when making ice cream please follow this link.

Ice creams that are covered in our course

  • Caramel ice cream
  • Cherry ice cream
  • Chestnut ice cream
  • Chocolate ice cream
  • Chocolate chip ice cream
  • Coconut ice cream
  • Coffee ice cream
  • Ginger ice cream
  • Maple syrup with walnuts
  • Mint ice cream
  • Peach ice cream
  • Pecan ice cream
  • Praline ice cream
  • Pistachio ice cream
  • Raspberry ice cream
  • Strawberry ice cream
  • Vanilla ice cream (with and without eggs)
  • and more to come....

Ice cream sauces covered in our course

  • Hot fudge sauce
  • Caramel sauce
  • Butterscotch sauce

Procedure for making ice cream

 

Ice cream consists of a few simple ingredients. Before you start making ice cream, you must fully understand the effect of each ingredient on the final product. Once you have that down, you can then begin to experiment with your recipe, in order to derive your own perfect recipe. Our video training lesson on how to make ice creams focuses on the effects of each ingredient followed by a recipe for you to try and enjoy.

We have simultaneously made vanilla ice cream , chocolate ice cream , strawberry ice cream using fresh strawberries, pineapple ice cream using canned fruit, and raspberry using raspberry puree so that we can distinguish what ingredient mostly affects the outcome of the ice cream.

All ice creams are 5-star recipes, although each ice cream has slight variations on the ingredients used.

From all ice creams tested, we were able to derive the correct formula for a perfect ice cream every time. Follow the link at the bottom of the article if you wish to find out the results of our findings.

What you will learn from our frozen desserts section of the course

In the frozen desserts section of the course, you will be introduced to the following terminologies;

  • Churning
  • Molding
  • ice cream categories
  • Sorbets
  • Sherbets
  • Density
  • Bombes
  • Partaits
  • Lecithin
  • Overrun
  • Texture
  • Stabilizers
  • Emulsifiers
  • Atomized glucose
  • Invert sugar

Topics covered in this part of the course are;

  • Hygiene
  • Molding ice creams to make ice cream cakes
  • Temperature of ice cream before serving
  •  Molding and unmolding ice cream cakes
  • Ice cream cake finishing mixtures
  • Making  ice cream without eggs
  • Making ice cream with eggs
  • Making ice cream with fruit purees
  • Marking Sorbets
  • Making Sherbets
  • Ice cream terminologies
  • Churning ice creams
  • Troubleshooting tips

 

More info on mixing methods or techniques used in french pastry

 

About our recipe tables

sample recipe table

Sample recipe table

All the recipes in our course are given by weight and percentages. The advantage of having a recipe in percentages is of extreme importance. You can alter the size of the recipe to any size you wish, and most importantly you can make recipe comparisons to notice the effects of ingredients between recipes.

 What a bad ice cream recipe looks like

If you are wondering what a bad ice cream recipe looks like, simply view the short video clip below;

What is your cost of making 'Ice cream'

If you would like to know what your cost is to making ice cream please follow this link.

 

Please follow this link in order to view our recipes and step-by-step video instructions on how to make perfect frozen desserts

 

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All you need to know about pie thickeners

How do starches work?

 Starches thicken liquids when they bond with water molecules and heated to the proper temperature.

If some starches are over heated they will release the liquid they once held, thus making the filling become runnier.

Common thickeners to use when making pies

Cornstarch

  • Stronger thickening power than flour.
  • Needs high heat (boiling point) to thicken a liquid.
  • Must be hydrated to thicken a filling.
  • Cannot withstand prolonged cooking; once filling mixture has thickened do not overmix or the cornstarch will loose its thickening power.
  • May impart a floury flavor.
  • Opaque filling.
  • Enhances the flavor of the fruit.
  • If the pie is to be eaten the day after baking, decrease the amount of cornstarch by 1 teaspoon.

Tapioca

  • Strong thickening power in relation to other starches.
  • Needs low heat to thicken a liquid.
  • Must be hydrated to thicken a filling.
  • Looses the thickening power after prolonged cooking.
  • Must be hydrated to thicken a filling.
  • Gives a gluey neutral flavor.
  • Clear filling.
  • To eat a pie shortly after baking use Tapioca starch.
  • Use Tapioca starch if you will end up heating the pie more than once.
  • Use tapioca starch when the pie will be frozen. Tapioca starch will not break down when the pie will be thawed.

Arrowroot

  • Strong thickening power in relation to other starches.
  • Needs high heat to thicken a liquid.
  • Must be hydrated to thicken a filling.
  • Can withstand prolonged cooking.
  • Gluey neutral flavor.
  • Clear filling.

TIP:Arrowroot is not broken down by acidic fruits; cranberry, grapefruit, kiwi, lemon, limes, orange, pomegranate, pineapple, strawberry, tangerines.

All-Purpose Flour

  • Weaker thickening power in relation to other starches; more flour must be used to achieve the same thickening power as other starches.
  • Needs moderate heat to thicken a liquid.
  • Must be hydrated to thicken a filling.
  • Can withstand prolonged cooking.
  • Gummy flour flavor.
  • Opaque filling.

Potato Starch

  • Very strong thickening power in relation to other starches.
  • Needs moderate heat to thicken a liquid a filling.
  • Cannot withstand prolonged cooking.
  • Gluey mild flavor.
  • Opaque filling.
  • Potato starch does not break down; filling will not become watery once baked

Miscellaneous info

Tips & tricks

  • Must mix the thickener with the sugar and the spices before mixing it with the fruit to prevent it from clumping up.
  • If you use more sugar than specified by the recipe, more thickener will be needed because sugar will release its moisture once heated, adding more liquid to the filling.
  • For lattice design pies use less thickener due to liquid evaporation during cooking.
  • To use less starch, mix the fruit with the sugar and let rest for about 1 hour in a colander over a large bowl. Reduce the fruit liquid/sugar mixture by simmering it at low heat, and place the thickened mixture back into the fruit filling.
  • Rule of thumb: Use 10g of starch per 115g of fruit.
  • Choose arrowroot, if you will be thickening an acidic fruit filling.
  • Rule of thumb: use about 2 tbsp of starch per 8-inch pie; use more starch for juicier fruits.
  • You can use pectin as a thickener but you must use precise acid and sugar amounts, as specified by manufacturer.
  • To tenderize your pie dough, add one teaspoon of lemon juice or vinegar per cup of flour in your pie dough recipe.
  • How much thickener do you need? It depends on the fruit. Fruits the have lots of pectin require less thickener.

Fruits info

High Pectin Fruits; apples, citrus fruits, apples, cranberries, currants, Plums, grapes, quinces.

Low Pectin Fruits; apricots, blueberries, cherries, peaches, pears, pineapple, raspberries, strawberries.

Acidic fruits; cranberry, grapefruit, kiwi, lemon, limes, orange, pomegranate, pineapple, strawberry, tangerines.

Semi-acidic fruits; Apple, blackberry, cherry, grapes, lychee, mango, nectarine, peach, pear,plums,raspberries.

Sweet fruits; Banana, date, fig, grape, papaya.

 

 

 

 

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 Chef Victoria

 

Chef's photo  Chef Victoria's photo
Repertoire Birthday cakes, Wedding cakes, special occasion cakes, cakes for children of all ages
Location Currently located in the Montreal area
Personal traits ---

NOTE: Shipping is not included in the price.



Design 1
Chef Victoria cake design 2
Design 2

Design 3
Chef Victoria cake design 4
Design 4

Design 5
how to make a colorful wedding cake for the spring time
Design 6
--- --- ---

 

Chef Victoria is currently in Cambride/kitchener area.
Tel: 514 553 2532

Chef Victoria's Facebook page

 

 

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Masking a cake

What is takes to perfect masking a cake

One very important task that needs to be mastered is how to mask a cake as quickly as possible and at the same time to come up with a perfect end product that is ready for display.

masked cake with candles

Masking is not difficult if you put the time to master the technique. For example, to cut an 8-inch cake in four layers sounds easy and straight forward, but once you try it (as a beginner), you will notice that some spots have been cut more thinly than others. There is only one thing you can do to correct this.

Cutting even cake layers

Practice cutting cakes. Spend a few months just cutting and masking cakes and you'll become an expect in no time. That's one job that is and always will be in demand in pastry shops.

What you need to begin masking a buttercream cake

  • Revolving cake stand
  • Serrated long knife
  • Offset spatula
  • Straight spatula
  • Cake board, one inch larger than the diameter of the cake
  • Flavored simple syrup
  • Buttercream of your choice
  • Piping bag with round or star tip
  • Decorating comb
  • Roasted nuts of your choice (optional)

Standard procedure for masking a cake

Crumb coating a cake
(photo: crumb-coating a cake)

  • Remove top crust of sponge cake.
  • Remove crust form the side of the sponge cake.
  • Remove crust form the bottom of the sponge cake.
  • Cut the sponge cake in 3 layers (optional: or more). Start cutting the cake to about 1/4 of the cake deep, rotate the cake and repeat all around.
  • Place the first cake layer on the workbench and apply simple syrup.The amount of syrup you use depends on the sponge cake recipe used.
  • Add the first buttercream layer using a plastic scraper to drop the buttercream onto the cake layer. Use an offset spatula to spread out the buttercream evenly all throughout the layer. Make sure the buttercream slightly oozes out past the cake.
  • Place the second cake layer on top of the buttercream. Make sure it is level before proceeding.
  • Apply simple syrup.
  • Apply the second layer of buttercream the same way.
  • Place the third and final cake layer (the underside of the cake downwards; towards the buttercream) on top.
  • Apply simple syrup on the top and final layer.
  • Move assembled cake onto a revolving cake stand in order to mask the cake.
  • Add the final buttercream on top of the cake (better to add too much than too little). Spread, flatten and smooth out the buttercream by pressing the spatula onto the buttercream and rotating the revolving cake stand.
  • Mask the sides with whatever buttercream is oozing out the cake layers. Mask the side a second time, using additional buttercream if the sponge cake is visible.The angle of the spatula is very important. It should be 90deg or perpendicular to the cake.
  • At this point, scrape off any excess buttercream all around the edge of the top layer, by using a spatula. Scrape towards the middle of the cake.
  • Make sure the cake is sitting exactly in the center of the revolving cake stand.Place the decorating comb 45 degrees to the cake and rotate stand towards the decorating comb.
  • Remove excess buttercream for the final time from the top of the cake.
  • Remove any excess buttercream between the revolving stand and the cake by placing a spatula in between the cake and the stand, and at the same time spinning the stand.
  • Slide the cake onto a cake bord from one edge. Once half the cake is on the cake board, lift off the cake from the revolving stand side and continue sliding it onto the cake board.
  • Holding the cake board on the palm of your hand, apply a thin layer of roasted almonds, half way up from the side of the cake, all around. Tap on the underside of the cake board to remove any excess nuts from the cake board.
  • Apply a border around the top of the cake using a round or star tip.

NOTES: Turntable is mainly used for masking only, although you can use it for cutting cake layers.
The finished cake is placed onto a cake board.

Procedure for masking a wedding cake

perfectly maksed cake slice

  • Place cake onto a revolving cake stand.
  • Remove a thin slice from the top surface of the cake. To create an even layer, first, create a guideline all around the cake using a serrated knife. Once you have the guideline, as you are rotating the cake keep cutting the cake  going deeper and deeper into the cake's center, until all section has been cut.
  • Shave off the bottom surface of the cake, same way as you did the top.
  • Clean revolving cake stand so that it is crumb-free.
  • Place the first cake layer on the revolving cake stand.                                          
  • Apply simple syrup on the first cake layer.
  • Add buttercream and spread it using an offset spatula.
  • Repeat for all remaining layers of cake, except the top layer.
  • Cover the cake with plastic wrap (for home bakers) and refrigerate the cake just to firm up the buttercream.
  • Remove a thin layer from the edge of the cake all around, while maintaining the cake's circular shape.
  • Ensure that the cake has the same height all around, standard size of an 8-inch cake would be about 9mm (3.5 inches) of height.
  • Apply simple syrup and then apply a thin layer of buttercream on the top final layer of the cake (called CRUMB COATING)
  • Spread some buttercream all around the sides of the cake. (called CRUMB COATING)
  • Use a metal rectangular bench scraper to remove excess buttercream from the sides, and make sure the sides of the cake remain perpendicular to the revolving cake stand.
  • Do the same for the top surface of the cake. Pull the excess buttercream (using the scraper) but make sure you pull the buttercream towards the center of the cake. (called CRUMB COATING)
  • Refrigerate the cake for at least one hour or until the buttercream is firm.
  • Mask the top and sides of the cake in a similar manner as we did when crumb coating the cake.
  • Again, use a metal bench scraper to make sure the sides of the cake are perpendicular to the cake board all around.
  • Freeze the cake for 10 minutes or refrigerate for 1 hour.
  • Repeat above step with a heated and dried metal bench scraper (dipped in hot water). You should hardly remove any buttercream from the cake at this point. Place in fridge temporarily.
  • Apply some buttercream or melted white chocolate (depending on the color of the sponge cake) onto the cakeboard to serve as glue.
  • Lift the cake off of the revolving cake stand using a straight spatula and the left palm of your hand (if you are right-handed) and transfer it onto a clean cake board. Make sure the cake sits perfectly in the center all around.
  • At this point you can make your cake border. Once you make a cake border all around the top and bottom edge of the cake, your cake is ready for display.

Tips & tricks when masking a cake

  •  To apply some simple syrup on the cake layer, you can use a plastic 'ketchup' bottle instead of using a brush. It is much quicker to apply.
  • Measure the actual amount of buttercream that you use on each layer so that all layers are identical in thickness.
  • Use a bit of white melted chocolate as glue to glue together the cake to the cake board.
  • To ensure that the cake has the same height all around, use a ruler and toothpicks.
  • You can use a level to check the finished cake for straightness.
  • Excess buttercream scarped off of a cake should not be mixed in with the 'clean' buttercream, because all of the buttercream will be contaminated with cake crumbs. Use another bowl for this buttercream.
  • If you want to have an absolutely white buttercream, use shortening instead of butter, but you will be compromising on taste.

 Terminology used when masking cakes

Crumbcoat

Crumb coat is the initial or base coat of icing (usually buttercream) that is thinly applied on 2 or more layers of cake. This is to seal in all cake crumbs before the final coat of buttercream (or whatever you are using,eg; fondant, ) is applied.

Masking

 Masking refers to the second coat (final coat) of icing (usually buttercream) covering the cake (top and sides).

Cake drum vs cake board

 Cake drum is a cake board that is thick and strong that may be round or square in shape and comes wrapped in silver foil.  Cake boards are used to hold cakes, while cake drums are used to hold heavier cakes such as 3-tier wedding cakes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Job opportunities at OnlinePastryTrainingSchoool.com

Currently we are looking for volunteers to translate articles from English to French. Each translation will accumulate towards getting a chance to win a FREE KREBS electric food spray gun among all volunteer translators (value of $360CAN).

You will also have free access to our complete online pastry training course for a period of 2 years

If this might be of interest to you, please contact us

 

FREE LM25 KREBS electric food spray gun



 

 

 

 

 

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